14
Table 3 
Supply and Demand in ARL Libraries, 1986‐2005 
Median Values for Time‐Series Trends22 
 
Year 
 
ILL: 
Borrowed 
ILL 
Lended 
Graduate
Students 
Teaching 
Faculty
Total 
Students
Serials
Purchased
Serials 
Received 
Monographs
Purchased
(Libraries)  (103)  (103)  (104) (101) (103) (36) (36)  (59)
       
1986 
7,047  16,092  2,327 1,124 16,684 15,775 3,318  32,425
1987 
7,387  16,318  3,078 1,195 17,029 16,514 3,477  26,204
1988 
7,881  17,476  3,251 1,222 17,485 15,948 3,367  24,947
1989 
8,547  19,638  3,312 1,285 17,866 15,983 3,345  26,997
1990 
9,595  20,837  3,314 1,278 17,745 16,128 4,304  27,545
1991 
10,397  23,285  3,310 1,295 18,290 15,962 4,500  27,659
1992 
11,362  22,514  3,539 1,356 18,273 15,673 5,100  26,735
1993 
12,489  22,740  3,745 1,281 18,450 15,441 5,082  24,933
1994 
14,007  24,039  3,794 1,289 18,305 15,099 5,518  25,321
1995 
14,472  24,864  3,914 1,308 18,209 14,320 6,107  25,695
1996 
15,278  25,720  3,904 1,251 18,320 14,723 5,983  25,560
1997 
16,264  25,463  3,942 1,263 18,166 14,820 5,757  28,494
1998 
17,656  27,223  3,880 1,247 18,335 14,063 7,111  24,133
1999 
18,942  26,837  3,933 1,255 18,609 14,192 6,546  24,398
2000 
20,475  27,044  3,844 1,239 18,908 14,541 7,944  27,694
2001 
21,902  28,950  4,159 1,279 19,102 13,682 7,915  30,459
2002 
21,339  29,021  4,067 1,251 19,925 17,594 8,769  31,406
2003 
22,146  33,421  4,167 1,268 21,132 18,115 8,871  33,177
2004 
25,737 33,934 4,461 1,369 21,562 22,311 9,991 29,787
2005 
25,729 36,325 4,595 1,355 22,047 22,404 11,203 30,217
       
Avg annual  
% change 
7.1% 4.4% 3.6% 1.0% 1.5% 1.9% 6.6% -0.4%
 
 
However, research libraries have responsibilities for future generations; cost considerations of short‐
term use are not adequate to ensure research level collections, whether in digital or analog formats.   
According to a report on collections and access issued by ARL, “developments in digital technology, the 
introduction of the Web and the Internet, and new methods of creating, sharing, and using knowledge 
have changed dramatically the traditionally understood definitions of library collections and access 
services. Building collections and creating access to them are no longer achieved just within the walls of 
the library. Broadly defined, collections and access responsibilities are no longer distinct spheres within 
research libraries. Collections and access responsibilities are inextricably linked—with each other, with 
other functions in the parent institutions, and, indeed, with other institutions. This interdependent and 
fluid environment presents challenges but, more importantly, it presents opportunities for librarians to 
take leadership roles in creating new information services in support of research and learning and 
thereby diffuse the library throughout the institution.”23 
22 All time series in this table were revised due to unavailable data. 
23 ARL Collections & Access Issues Task Force, “Collections & Access for the 21st‐Century Scholar: Changing Roles of Research 
Libraries,” ARL: A Bimonthly Report on Research Library Issues and Actions from ARL, CNI, and SPARC, no. 225 (December 2002), 
http://www.arl.org/newsltr/225/. 
Previous Page Next Page