10
CHANGE IN SERIAL UNIT COSTS 
 
  The story of struggling library budgets during the 1990s had been told in terms of the “serials crisis.”  
Serial unit costs have been increasing much faster than inflation for almost two decades, as has been shown 
in Table 2 and Graph 2.  The electronic environment may indeed be disrupting a dysfunctional system, but it 
is important to keep in mind that serial subscriptions exhibit extreme inelasticity of demand (i.e., demand is 
very high for continuing a subscription), sometimes to the detriment of other budget lines.   
 
Table 2 
Monograph and Serial Costs in ARL Libraries, 1986‐2005 
Median Values for Time‐Series Trends13 
 
Year  Serial 
Unit Cost 
Serial
Expenditures
Monograph
Unit Cost
Monograph
Expenditures
Serials 
Purchased 
Monographs 
Purchased 
(Libraries) 
(36)  (101) (59) (98) (36)  (59) 
1986 
$89.81  $1,475,825 $29.28 $1,118,931 15,775  32,425 
1987 
$108.12  $1,769,353 $31.81 $1,060,754 16,514  26,204 
1988  $117.41  $1,942,350 $36.06 $1,109,845 15,948  24,947 
1989  $129.95  $2,097,789 $38.44 $1,093,858 15,983  26,997 
1990 
$135.61  $2,289,075 $40.74 $1,329,950 16,128  27,545 
1991 
$153.46  $2,519,065 $42.35 $1,396,566 15,962  27,659 
1992 
$173.69  $2,610,837 $43.99 $1,348,786 15,673  26,735 
1993 
$188.79  $2,917,381 $43.74 $1,284,116 15,441  24,933 
1994 
$203.87  $2,892,898 $44.72 $1,282,569 15,099  25,321 
1995 
$217.38  $3,128,181 $44.98 $1,365,046 14,320  25,695 
1996 
$223.98  $3,384,928 $46.73 $1,437,028 14,723  25,560 
1997 
$250.74  $3,610,714 $46.42 $1,457,789 14,820  28,494 
1998  $252.28  $3,814,162 $47.59 $1,486,436 14,063  24,133 
1999  $271.51  $4,093,793 $47.74 $1,496,687 14,192  24,398 
2000  $310.62  $4,430,030 $47.59 $1,645,248 14,541  27,694 
2001 
$279.07  $4,610,327 $48.31 $1,848,622 13,682  30,459 
2002 
$289.84  $4,915,339 $50.35 $1,806,964 17,594  31,406 
2003 
$282.20  $5,372,822 $52.80 $1,858,280 18,115  33,177 
2004 
$256.01 $5,552,216 $51.24 $1,824,296 22,311 29,787
2005 
$239.58 $5,933,378 $52.96 $1,776,416 22,404 30,217
Avg annual  
% change 
5.3% 7.6% 3.2% 2.5% 1.9% -0.4%
 
  From the user perspective, ownership and access are interrelated; distinctions between the two may 
only exist inside the research library, where ownership of materials may be more closely linked to 
preservation functions. Data collected through LibQUAL+TM show that the demand relates to very strong 
user perceptions that libraries are not adequately meeting users’ need of access to full runs of journal titles 
and delivering full‐text on the desktop.14  It is clear that some of the major scientific and technical publishers  
13 Series for all items except Monograph Expenditures were revised due to unavailable data. 
14 Bruce Thompson, Colleen Cook, and R.L. Thompson, “Reliability and Structure of LibQUAL+ Scores,” portal: Libraries and the Academy 2 
(2002): 3‐12; Colleen Cook, Fred Heath, and Bruce Thompson, “Score Norms for Improving Library Service Quality: A LibQUAL+ Study,” 
portal: Libraries and the Academy 2 (2002): 13‐26; Fred Heath, Colleen Cook, Martha Kyrillidou, and Bruce Thompson, “ARL Index and 
Previous Page Next Page