128  ·  Representative Documents:  Regional Accrediting Agency Reports
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Institutional Self-Study Prepared for the New England Association of Schools and Colleges. Chapter 7:
Library and Other Information Resources
http://web.mit.edu/accreditation/report/pdfs/2009_MIT_Accreditation_Report_Final.pdf
Chapter 7: Library and Other Information Resources
Chapter 7 Page 82
I. MIT LIBRARIES
Background
Service model
Training to make effective use of resources
Recent improvements to space
Planning
Collaboration
II. PROJECTIONS: LIBRARY
Digital Library Program requirements
Support for improved scholarly communication
III. OTHER INFORMATION RESOURCES
Office of Educational Innovation and Technology
Access to IT resources
Athena system
Policies regarding appropriate use of technology resources
Evaluating IT effectiveness
IV. PROJECTIONS: OTHER INFORMATION RESOURCES
Technology for managing course content
MIT Student Information System
Envisioning a new student-information system
MIT’s library and information resources are integral to our teaching, learning, and research. From inventing
digital platforms that make subjects come alive, to developing new ways to share course content with the
world, MIT harnesses the educational potential of technology in creative, dynamic ways. Subjects like
“Visualizing Cultures” wed images and scholarly commentary to illuminate social and cultural history, while
our Technologically Enabled Active Learning classrooms use animated simulations to help students visualize
concepts and carry out experiments. Reflecting our commitment to service to the nation and the world, our
OpenCourseWare (OCW) site is a pioneering experiment in the sharing of knowledge. Through OCW, core
teaching materials from virtually the entire MIT curriculum over 1,800 classes are published on the Web
and made available to a worldwide audience for free.
These initiatives demonstrate that as MIT develops and adapts technology—and applies it to education—the
daily experience of students at the Institute and around the world can be transformed. Within this environment,
libraries continue to play a critical role. The MIT Libraries are realigning to better enable the design and
delivery of information services based on the needs of a broadly networked interdisciplinary community.
Informed and driven by a deep commitment to a service model, the MIT Libraries are well positioned to
anticipate the emerging information requirements of faculty, students, and researchers. Through the
development of new tools such as DSpace, an online repository, they have set a new global standard for how
digital preservation can work in the life of a university. This chapter explores our work within the MIT
Libraries and our IT infrastructure to ensure that our information resources meet the demands of MIT’s
educational mission.
I. MIT LIBRARIES
The mission of the MIT Libraries is firmly aligned with that of MIT:
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