on the strength of the NSF’s plan requirement to diversify, and that quickly.
Find non-NSF people to help. Do a survey or focus-group study to demon-
strate non-NSF-related data-management needs. Pay some attention to the
digital humanities.”8
The emergence of collaboration as a requirement itself in this enterprise
of response cannot be underestimated, and it continues to be born out in ways
suggestive of communities of practice—knowledge networks of people
sharing common interests and commonly created intellectual resources.9 In a
community of practice, everyone contributes to the whole, as members share
information, seek collective wisdom, and learn
from each other. The “ARL Data Sharing Support
Group,” a mailing list based in Google Groups, the
creation of which coincided with the launch in
December 2010 of ARL’s web-based Guide for
Research Libraries: The NSF Data Sharing Policy,10
exemplifies such a community. With more than 200
members, the group has informally discussed a
variety of questions, ranging from inquiries
regarding video archiving and storage solutions; to challenges surrounding
the cultivation of a data services program needing the support of intra-campus
alliances; to the idea of sharing data management plans—or not—among
researchers belonging to the same institution. Members also post announce-
ments about developments in the data management sphere, and ARL uses the
list as a vehicle for alerting librarians to new content in the Guide for Research
Libraries: The NSF Data Sharing Policy. Issues and ideas that have arisen in this
forum include the following:
How will data management plans help federal funding agencies in the
future? The NSF data management plan requirement arguably enables
the agency to do an environmental scan, in the sense of finding out what
is being accomplished in this problem space across US institutions. The
knowledge resulting from NSF's review of these plans could inform the
development of baseline best practices and policies concerning the future
curation of scientific research data.
There has been some brief discussion about surveys, including survey
models to follow, whom to survey, and what to survey. While there are
RLI 274
14
Joining in the Enterprise of Response in the Wake of the NSF Requirement
(
C O N T I N U E D
)
FEBRUARY 2011 RESEARCH LIBRARY ISSUES: A BIMONTHLY REPORT FROM ARL, CNI, AND SPARC
The emergence of collaboration as a requirement
itself in this enterprise of response cannot be
underestimated, and it continues to be born
out in ways suggestive of communities of
practice—knowledge networks of people
sharing common interests and commonly
created intellectual resources.
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