Title Index by IndexTitle : I

  • Impact Measures in Research Libraries, SPEC Kit 318 (September 2010)
    Title: SPEC Kit 318: Impact Measures in Research Libraries (September 2010)
    Abstract:

    This SPEC Kit explores the tools and methods libraries use to gauge the difference they make for their user community, the topics assessment practitioners probe and the results they obtain, the effects of impact assessment, and whether institutions that publicize positive impact evidence see a difference in the level of financial or political support from their parent institutions.

    The survey asked ARL member libraries whether they have investigated five major areas of possible library impact: correlations between measures of library use and student success pre- or post graduation; correlations between participation in library instruction and information literacy skills; correlations between measures of library use and research output; attempts to calculate how much financial value the library contributes to the parent institution or user community; and any other areas of library impact. Within each of these five areas, the survey asked which measures were correlated, which methods were used to collect data, what conclusions were drawn, who instigated the study, whether the study was one-time or ongoing, whether the results were shared outside the library, and whether the results were used to influence decisions at the library or parent institution.

    By the March deadline, responses had been submitted by 55 of the 124 ARL member libraries for a response rate of 44%. Nineteen respondents (34%) report having conducted a study in one or more of the five impact areas and 13 others (24%) are planning to conduct studies. Relatively speaking, library instruction is the area that has seen the most impact assessment activities; 15 respondents (27%) have studied this area and 12 others (22%) have plans to. Each of the other areas has been studied by between one and five libraries; between three and nine other libraries plan to conduct studies in the next 12 months. The remaining 23 respondents (42%) report their library has not and has no plans to study impact measures.

    This SPEC Kit includes documentation from respondents in the form of impact assessment goals, user surveys, and calculations of library value.

  • Impact of Academic Library Resources on First-Year Students’ Learning Outcomes (RLI 290, 2017) (5-20)
    Title: The Impact of Academic Library Resources on First-Year Students’ Learning Outcomes (RLI 290, 2017)
  • Importance of Net Neutrality to Research Libraries in the Digital Age (Dec. 2010) (10-18)
    Title: The Importance of Net Neutrality to Research Libraries in the Digital Age (Dec. 2010)
  • Improving Access with Open-Access Publishing Funds (April 2010) (9-11)
    Title: Improving Access with Open-Access Publishing Funds (April 2010)
  • Innovation and R&D, SPEC Kit 339 (December 2013)
    Title: SPEC Kit 339: Innovation and R&D (December 2013)
    Keyword(s): research library%3B innovation%3B research and development%3B process improvement%3B experimentation%3B transformation%3B strategic operations%3B futurecasting%3B planning
    Abstract:

    This SPEC Kit investigates the current state of both innovation and R&D in research library organizations. It examines what outward-facing commitments libraries have made to innovation and R&D, and what foundations are in place to support these activities. It asked who is involved in innovative activities, how libraries organize themselves to create, support, and sustain innovation, and how they measure the resulting outcomes. It also collected data on which research libraries support R&D, at what level, for what purposes, and how these activities are organized, funded, and assessed.

    This SPEC Kit includes examples of strategic plans and other documents that describe library support for innovation and research and development activities, organization charts, descriptions of research awards, and job descriptions of staff responsible for innovation and R&D.

  • Institutional Repositories, SPEC Kit 292 (July 2006)
    Title: SPEC Kit 292: Institutional Repositories (July 2006)
    Abstract:

    This SPEC Kit collects baseline data about ARL member institutions’ institutional repository activities.

    For the purposes of this survey, an IR was simply defined as a permanent, institution-wide repository of diverse locally produced digital works (e.g., article preprints and postprints, data sets, electronic theses and dissertations, learning objects, and technical reports) that is available for public use and supports metadata harvesting. If an institution shares an IR with other institutions, it was within the scope of this survey. Not included in this definition were scholars’ personal Web sites; academic department, school, or other unit digital archives that are primarily intended to store digital materials created by members of that unit; or disciplinary archives that include digital materials about one or multiple subjects that have been created by authors from many different institutions (e.g., arXiv.org).

    The survey was distributed to the 123 ARL member libraries in January 2006. Eighty-seven libraries (71%) responded to the survey. Of those, 37 (43%) have an operational IR, 31 (35%) are planning for one by 2007 at the latest, and 19 (22%) have no immediate plans to develop an IR. The survey found that most IRs had been established in the last two years (or had just been established). By far, the library was likely to have been the most active institutional advocate of the IR. It was also likely to have been the primary unit leading and supporting the IR effort, sometimes in partnership with the institutional information technology unit. The main reasons for establishing an IR were to increase the global visibility of, preserve, provide free access to, and collect and organize the institution’s scholarship.

    This SPEC Kit includes documentation from respondents in the form of IR home pages, IR usage statistics, deposit policies, metadata policies, preservation policies, and IR proposals

  • Integrating Special Collections into the Composition Classroom: A Case Study of Collaborative Digital Curriculum (RLI 283, 2013) (16-20)
    Title: Integrating Special Collections into the Composition Classroom: A Case Study of Collaborative Digital Curriculum (RLI 283, 2013)
  • Introduction: A Special Issue on Distinctive Collections (Dec. 2009) (2-3)
    Title: Introduction: A Special Issue on Distinctive Collections (Dec. 2009)
  • Introduction: Positioning Liaison Librarians for the 21st Century (Aug. 2009) (2-3)
    Title: Introduction: Positioning Liaison Librarians for the 21st Century (Aug. 2009)