13
Association of Research Libraries
Research Library Issues 290 2017
development of this learning outcome compared to their peers who
did not use the library resource = .290, p .001). These results
held when we controlled for the propensity scores in the model.
The second regression model assessed whether first-year students
who used a library resource at least once were significantly more
likely to report development of written communication skills.
The results suggest that first-year students who used any library
resource at least once had significantly higher development
of this learning outcome compared to their peers who did not
use the library resource = .226, p .001). These results held
when we controlled for the propensity scores in the model.
Finally, the third regression model assessed whether first-year
students who used a library resource at least once were significantly
more likely to report development of reading comprehension
skills. The results suggest that first-year students who used any
library resource at least once had significantly higher development
of this learning outcome compared to their peers who did not
use the library resource = .207, p .001). These results held
when we controlled for the propensity scores in the model.
Discussion, Limitations, and Recommendations
The results of this study suggest that first-year students who used
a library resource at least once were significantly more likely than
their peers who did not use the library to report development
of critical thinking and analytical skills, written communication
skills, and reading comprehension skills. As researchers continue
to explore the potential ways in which academic libraries
contribute to students’ success, this study—along with others35—
suggests that the attendant benefits can also include students’
development of learning outcomes beyond information literacy.
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