RLI 280
ReseaRch libRaRy tRends: a histORical pictuRe Of seRvices, ResOuRces, and spending
23
SEPTEMBER 2012 RESEARCH LIBRARY ISSUES: A QUARTERLY REPORT FROM ARL, CNI, AND SPARC
data will no longer be tied to format (serials or monographs). It is important to track expenditures for
continuing resources as they make libraries vulnerable to monopolistic tendencies, but it is clear that
“serials” are morphing into a variety of different online products and services.
Figure 3. supply and demand in aRl libraries, 1986–2011
-25%
0%
25%
50%
75%
100%
125%
150%
175%
200%
225%
250%
275%
300%
2010 2007 2004 2001 1998 1995 1992 1989 1986
Monographs
Purchased
(+10%)
Faculty
(+30%)
Total
Students
(+46%)
Graduate
Students
(+139%)
Interlibrary
Lending
(+102%)
Interlibrary
Borrowing
(+280%)
% Change
Since 1986
Figure 3 shows that interlibrary borrowing and lending, which experienced a marked growth from 1986
to 2006, are now steadily declining, likely due to the wide availability of information resources. Overall
research libraries continue to lend more than they borrow, indicating the rich and unique level of
resources available at these institutions, thus supporting their mission to serve researchers beyond their
institutional boundaries.
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