a corresponding expansion of fair use rights is one way to maintain the
appropriate balance between incentives for creators and access for the public.
In an effort to better understand and realize the benefits of fair use, ARL is
conducting, in collaboration with the Program on Information Justice and
Intellectual Property at the American University (AU) Washington College of
Law and the AU Center for Social Media, a three-stage project to help academic
and research libraries better employ fair use. This initiative is possible due to
the generous support of The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The recently
completed research phase of the project captures how practioners in the
academic and research library community interpret and employ fair use in key
areas of practice, including support for teaching, and learning; support for
faculty and student scholarship; preservation; exhibition and public outreach;
and serving disabled communities. In the current phase, the project team is
convening a series of round-table discussions with academic and research
librarians that will serve as the basis for a code of best practices in fair use for
academic and research libraries. The third and final stage will involve extensive
outreach to and collaboration with academic and research librarians, and others
in academic leadership, to promote a better understanding of fair use and
adoption of the code. Butler’s article summarizes the project’s Stage One
findings from a series of interviews with academic and research librarians to
determine how they are using fair use and related exemptions in the Copyright
Act to meet library mission.
Open and Public Access Policies
The Internet can accelerate discovery, enable new strategies to address complex
research challenges, and democratize access. To take advantage of these
opportunities and to further their mission of creating, preserving, and
disseminating knowledge, many academic and research institutions are taking
steps to capture the benefits of open and public access policies by developing
campus policies for the timely, free, and online dissemination of institutional
research outputs. As noted by David E. Shulenburger, Vice President for
Academic Affairs, Association of Public and Land-grant Universities, “our
member universities have a special mission of outreach and engagement with
their communities; ensuring that the research they produce is widely available to
the public at no additional costs to them is a true expression of that mission.”3
These institutional policies build on the growing adoption—by funding agencies,
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Three Key Public Policies for Research Libraries
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DECEMBER 2010 RESEARCH LIBRARY ISSUES: A BIMONTHLY REPORT FROM ARL, CNI, AND SPARC
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