how incremental changes would affect the ratings by faculty and students, if
they would only see small steps of improvement. We were encouraged by the
experiences of others. In particular, Eric Ackermann, commented:
First, as published literature demonstrates, dramatic changes to a library’s
physical spaces such as extensive remodeling yield dramatic, immediate
increases in user satisfaction. By extension we anticipate that the
incremental changes that we can afford to implement will yield modest
gains in user satisfaction over time.4
The experience of annual capital investments in the library building and
facilities over the last six years verifies this statement (see Chart 1).5
[KEVIN: PLEASE PLACE CHART 1 IN THIS VICINITY.]
In spring 2004 the perceived service level scores on the Library as Place
dropped, while the zone of tolerance moved up the scale, i.e., both minimum
and desired service level scores increased and the comments on the building
reached new depths. However, there was a positive outcome. The LibQUAL+®
results played a significant role in highlighting the need for capital investment in
the library’s physical environment and facilities. Users repeatedly described the
RLI 271
15
LibQUAL+® and the “Library as Place” at the University of Glasgow
(
C O N T I N U E D
)
AUGUST 2010 RESEARCH LIBRARY ISSUES: A BIMONTHLY REPORT FROM ARL, CNI, AND SPARC
2003 2004 2005 2006 2008 2009 2010
8.0
7.5
7.0
6.5
6.0
5.5
Y E A R
M
E
A
N
Chart 1. Library as Place Scores,
University of Glasgow, 2003–10 (except 2007)
Perceived score (red dot) within the zone of tolerance (blue floating bar)
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