opportunity to be field librarians in ARL’s study on new publications models.3
This involved interviewing researchers on how they may be utilizing or creating
new models of scholarship. These interviews allowed our liaison librarians to
put into practice their recent faculty engagement
training. The interview guide was also well designed
for promoting the kind of faculty engagement we
were encouraging: the questions were designed to
invite librarians to operate from a place of curiosity
in their dialogue with researchers
Involvement in the study demonstrated to our liaison librarians that faculty
engagement about new models of scholarship can be a natural progression from
their usual liaison activity. Further, it afforded them the opportunity to learn
more about faculty research needs and where they could potentially advance
their liaison roles in scholarly communications. Many librarians observed that
their faculty loved talking about their research, making this kind of engagement
an easy and enjoyable experience. One liaison librarian reported, “the
conversation [with the faculty member] led her to a greater understanding of the
larger nature of how this faculty member conducted research and how he built
up a network of contacts.” Another said: “this kind of liaising effort allowed me
to see firsthand how the faculty researcher communicates, networks, keeps
informed and gets up-to-date information via blogs, RSS feeds, RSS feed
aggregates, Wikis, YouTube, and various other online groups and mechanisms.”
In addition, several liaison librarians became involved with working with a
faculty member to further develop their new publishing.
Developing Service Models to Facilitate
Compliance with New Public Access Mandates
In response to the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and the US
National Institutes of Health (NIH) and similar emerging mandates in Canada
from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada
(NSERC) and Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada
(SSHRC) that are expected to follow, the Project Manager constructed a working
group of key medical faculty, the Director of the Office of Research Services,
UBC grant fund managers, and key medical and health liaison librarians to
deliberate on support for UBC researchers who must comply with these
mandates. As part of the project plan, health sciences liaison librarians were
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Scholarly Communications: Planning for the Integration of Liaison Librarian Roles
(
C O N T I N U E D
)
AUGUST 2009 RESEARCH LIBRARY ISSUES: A BIMONTHLY REPORT FROM ARL, CNI, AND SPARC
This kind of liaising effort allowed me to see
firsthand how the faculty researcher communicates,
networks, keeps informed, and gets up-to-date
information...
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